Gardening Instructions

Baked Ziti

Peach– Peach pits are quite simple to grow. Using vice grips, the seeds can be cracked open to release the actual seed inside. I do not recommend using a hammer or knives to open the seeds. Hammers can damage the tender seed inside, while knives can be quite dangerous. Simply wash and dry the seeds after eating them, then use vice grips to crack them open. Afterwards, encase the seeds in a moist paper towel and put the towel in a sealed plastic bag. Keep the seeds inside the fridge for two to three weeks. Periodically check for molds.

After two to three weeks, the skin of the seeds should start to peel already and the seeds have begun germinating. Plant the seeds in a soil. Out of the twelve seeds I had, two have had the most growth. I recommend pinching the top of the seedlings in order to encourage the growth of branches. Do this once of twice, but not much more.

Plum– Plums can be planted the same way. There is no difference in the process. Although plum seeds are smaller and tend to split more easily. I also find that peaches tend to grow more aggressively than plums.

Plums and peaches can have spindly growth or simply not grow properly. I found that plums tend to do this more than peaches. I try to trim the unwanted growth out, change pots, and apply chemicals to no avail. I ended up weeding them out.

Cherry– Cherry can be planted the same way as peaches and plums. It is notable however that the seed inside the shell of cherries, also much like plums and peaches, have compounds which can turn to cyanide when swallowed. I’m not sure about the other fruits, but two or three crushed cherry pits can be quite deadly when eaten.

Cherry seeds grow fast then tend to stop and show no progress for a long time. I do not advice pinching the top of cherry seedling to encourage branch growth. Even as I wait for branch buds to grow on my seedlings, they are growing very slowly to the point of many of the leaves turning brown.

Apple– The moist paper towel technique can be done with apple seeds as well. Unlike the other drupes, apple seeds don’t need to be cracked open. They can just be placed in the moist paper towel and plastic back directly after washing. This time, they should not be kept inside the refrigerator but somewhere consistently warm, like behind the refrigerator. The seeds should be sprouting roots within two weeks.

Like cherry seeds, apple seeds can also be poisonous, but an average person needs to swallow over a hundred seeds in order to get close to a lethal dose. Apple seedlings tend to grow aggressively. Some leaves might have some rusting, but I find that most of my apple seedlings are growing healthily with no problems.

Persimmon– Persimmons are germinated the same way as apples. There is not need to crack the seeds or peel the skin. Simply place the plastic bag container in a warm place. I have read that they are difficult to germinate, but I have found it to be the opposite. Growing them from seeds is pretty straightforward.

Avocado– Avocado seeds are slow to germinate. They start growing roots and leaves when suspended halfway in a glass of water after four to six weeks. Simply wash avocado seeds, punch toothpicks into them to suspend them in water, then keep them somewhere sunny. While suspended, they tend to get slimy or moldy. Simply wipe the slime and the mold out and occasionally change the water.

After six weeks, plant the avocado seedlings. Some recommend pinching the seedlings in order to encourage branch growth but avocados tend to grow really slowly so some are understandably hesitant to do so. Please note that avocados, much like native tropical plants, need plenty of sunlight.

Mango– Mango seeds are germinated the same way as avocados. Simply scrub the mango seeds and dry them after eating. Once they are dry, it is easier to cut them open to release the seeds inside the shell. Use scissors to do this.

The problem with mangoes is that they tend to be very sensitive and will develop fungal disease, in my case anthracnose, which causes the tips and up to half of the leaves to turn brown. Apparently, mangoes will get sick when it’s either too dry or too humid, or if it is watered to much. It is a very finicky plant. When this happens, use copper-based fungicide to fight the infection. Absent of that, try not to water too much, especially the leaves. Also, trim off infected parts of the leaves with clean scissors. I disinfect the trimmed parts with hydrogen peroxide.

Kumquat– I have not grown any other citrus fruits other than the kumquat. I would like to grow calamansi, but the fruit is very difficult to find in the country. Also, compared to oranges and lemons, kumquats have small fruit and leaves, which make them ideal to be kept in small places.

Kumquats will have several seeds per fruit. A small pack of kumquat could easily yield a person over a hundred seeds. Gather the seeds, rinse them and place them between a moist paper towel, then seal it in a plastic bag. Like apples and persimmons, keep the plastic bag in a warm place. Check the bag once a week for molds, rinse, then continue keeping the seeds warm. They should be ready to plant within three weeks.

Out of all of the fruits I planted, kumquats appear to be the most willing to grow. Most, if not all of the seeds have grown into seedlings, with some seeds splitting to become one, two, or even three plants. The only problem I’ve encountered is that I ended up with too many kumquat seedlings, too many to give away, and that’s an excellent problem to have.

Mangosteen– Mangosteens, the queen of fruits, is very difficult to grow. I’ve tried several times now with no success. It’s an experimental process at the moment. I’ve planted them directly in soil, put them in a moist paper towel, kept them cold, and kept them warm. Roots simply will now grow out of their seeds. I read that because mangosteens harbor fruit flies, the fruit is irradiated to kill insects before they are packed and sent overseas. Unfortunately, this process also kills the seed inside.

I’ve been trying to get mangosteens to grow in hopes that the seed I got were from fruit that somehow escaped the irradiation process. It would appear that so far, the irradiation process is airtight. Mangosteens are uniquely delicious with their tangy sweetness. Unfortunately, they seem to be the opposite of kumquats. They arrive to me dead and are impossible to grow.

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